Monday October 23 2017

Posted by Tomas on January 15, 2016
  • A mature Golden Eagles, fledglings have been spotted in the mountains of Baja California Sur
    A mature Golden Eagles, fledglings have been spotted in the mountains of Baja California Sur
  • This fledgling is nearly mature, but note the incomplete feathers at the back of the head
    This fledgling is nearly mature, but note the incomplete feathers at the back of the head
  • Puma tracks have been seen in the mountains of Baja California Sur, but no one has laid eyes on a cat yet
    Puma tracks have been seen in the mountains of Baja California Sur, but no one has laid eyes on a cat yet
  • A puma concolor cub ventures bravely out of the den. The juvenile markings clearly evident and useful
    A puma concolor cub ventures bravely out of the den. The juvenile markings clearly evident and useful

 The Deputy Director of the Biosphere Reserve Sierra de la Laguna in Baja California South,  Victor Anguiano , reported that a rare pair of Golden Eagles has successfully produced fledglings. It is estimated that there are only about 150 pairs of this bird in Mexico.

"We have seen in the area of ​​the Biosphere Reserve Sierra de la Laguna, golden eagles. In this case, "fledglings" or juveniles; although we can not determine whether they are nesting right there or come from far away, " he said 

Victor Anguiano  explained that he does not yet know precisely how many birds are in the area located south of the city of La Paz and north of Los Cabos, as at this stage in their development they change color and markings rapidly as they mature and the same bird could be counted as more than one.

"What we do know how many we are dealing with yet, because they are young eagles [...] we do not have the exact number of how many, because the pattern of colors of which change as they grow and are different, so, for example, maybe we are seeing 5 different golden eagles or the same bird, in various shades of color, "he said.

The official BCS Conanp  said that this represents a step forward in the conservation of this species in the country, as currently there are very few reproducing pairs, and care of the area is also essential so that they can reproduce. "We would need to capture some assessments and determine how many are [...] This means that there is an advance in the preservation of this bird, we know that is an endangered species. The country has only about 150 pairs of eagles."

Yes, Virginia, there are Cougars in those Hills

Victor Anguiano, also spoke about the puma (Puma concolor) a species that lives in the same area, explaining that it is very difficult to gather a good census on these animals, because so far all that has been documented are tracks, and have not been physically seen as people who have environmental management units  such as  "Palo Amarillo" -  unveiled in recent days.

"Yes, there cougars in the area, but would fail to make a detailed assessment. We have seen footprints, but this does not mean that more cougars. "

"Rain can be a factor in the reproduction of felines, also has much to do food, type of food for them, and not only a this season rainy, but it can take up to 2 to 4 years to know." The tracks could be a local pair or it could be a single transitory animal.

Finally, the Assistant Director of the Biosphere Reserve Sierra de la Laguna stressed that more than footprints need to be identified to know that there are more of this big cats out there and study is needed by experts in the subject . "Just to see paw prints and say that they are of a puma, it requires experts, and right now we do not have personnel to send and make monitoring; it also requires funding to make it  happen" he said.

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